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htc-desire-c-300x215

HTC Desire C smartphone

The HTC Desire C is a smartphone from HTC that runs on Android 4.0. The HTC Desire C is a budget Android smartphone with simple hardware in order to keep
 costs down. The screen is a 3.5 inch touchscreen and it features a 5 megapixel rear camera. The HTC Desire C is in the lower end of HTC’s Desire line up of smartphones. Despite it’s low-end specs, the HTC Desire C supports and will ship with the latest version of the Android operating system. Here are the full specs:

 

  • 600 MHz processor
  • 256 MB RAM
  • 2.5 inch 320 x 480 display
  • 5 MP rear camera (no front camera)
  • 4 GB on board flash storage
  • microSD port
  • Bluetooth + WiFi connectivity
  • 1,300 mAh battery
  • Ships with Beats music software
  • Supports 3.5G in Europe and HSDPA in the US

Web & Mobile Application Developer

DateIITians.com is hiring part time web and applicaiton developer, Mobile/ Andriod/ iPhone application developer.

What are we looking in you?

  • Hands-on experience in building compelling web applications.
  • Strong interest in product design and building irresistible user interfaces.
  • Expertise in PHP, JavaScript and CSS.
  • Significant experience in developing web applications.
  • Undergraduate degree in computer science or equivalent experience.
  • And, of course a deep love for troubleshooting/fixing big bugs out there.
  • iPhone, Android and mobile based applications.
  • Game, Entertainment based applications.

Why would you want to work with us?

  • Work with the best.
  • Expand your mind – Working on finding innovative solutions, you will grow your skill set.
  • Innovations – They are not only welcome but are expected even if its “not your job”.
  • Work at your ease. There are no time restrictions. Work at your free will whenever you want.
  • Experience working in the start-up along with the founders.
  • Your responsibilities will grow as you go on performing better and better.
  • Dedicated time to innovate: 30 % time devoted to developing and implementing new feature ideas.
  • Opportunity to show your worth to the world.

For more info please visit http://alpha.dateiitians.com/about
Visit us: http://www.dateiitians.com
You can also send your CV at contact@dateiitians.com

10 Things Colleges Don’t Tell Young Entrepreneurs at Graduation

Starting a business just out of school? Take notes, as there are a few things you should know about entrepreneurship that college simply won’t prepare you for. Here are 10 things your university won’t teach you:

1. “Hope you liked living like a college student.”
Now that you’re out of school, you’re ready to get your own place, maybe buy a car and stop eating Ramen noodles. But, when you’re working for yourself, personal overhead can kill your business before it starts. The more money you spend on yourself and your lifestyle, the less you’ll have to invest in your business.

Related: A Note to Young Treps: Put Down the Ramen

2. “There are no right answers.” 
The problems you tackle in school are designed to have both right and wrong answers. When you start a business you can get good advice from experts, but every business is different and you may not know whether you’re right until your business flourishes or founders. You need to find a way to thrive without a clear path.

3. “Cramming won’t help you succeed.” Skills such as memorizing information and following a professor’s directions won’t get your business off the ground. It’s time to break out of the good-student mode and take chances. Stop meeting expectations and start exceeding them.

4. “Average is never good enough.”
You may have been able to pass a class by just earning Bs and Cs, but if your business isn’t scoring As, the competition will destroy you. Many of the best and the brightest choose to start their own businesses and you will be facing them for funding, attention and customers.

5. “It’s finals week all the time.” 
Plan on doing plenty of hard work and withstanding long hours. Starting a business means sleep may take precedence over going out and partying with your friends. For entrepreneurs, there are never enough hours in a day.

6. “Your degree doesn’t matter.”
It’s true that some schools take more time preparing young entrepreneurs for the start-up world, and the contacts you’ll make can help you down the road. But generally, where you graduate from won’t matter to venture funders or other entrepreneurs. Having a stellar idea and the ability to turn it into a reality is what counts.

7. “You’re on your own.”
In college, you have the advantage of learning from and questioning faculty who often have insights that help you understand a class. With your own business, it’s important to find mentors to talk you through obstacles. For guidance, draw on operations such as SCORE, which is a group of retired businesspeople. Or, check with your past professors or alumni groups for people who can lend a hand.

Related: A Good Mentor Will Tell It Like It Is

8. “Say goodbye to your old friends.” Maybe you chose your friends based on shared interests such as liking the same kinds of movies or a shared preference for the hamburgers over macaroni and cheese in the cafeteria. You’ll still want to have relationships, but your criteria will change. Old friends who move into salaried positions won’t understand your challenges as well as other entrepreneurs. Look for people like you so that you can compare notes and share approaches. Your social life, such as it is, should also include getting to know potential customers and suppliers.

Related: What to Do When Friends Want to Be Co-Founders

9.”You can’t skip work.”
To succeed as an entrepreneur, you must be present. You need to be there, committed and willing to work hard, every single day.

10. “Failure is OK.”
One F won’t ruin a college career, and one failure — or more — doesn’t mean that your next idea won’t take off. Keep working your hardest, modify your business or start another one, and you may graduate from this demanding school of business with a company you can be proud of.

This story originally appeared on Young Entrepreneur

2G spectrum case: A Raja gets bail, to walk out of Tihar jail after 15 months

Former telecommunications minister A Raja was on Tuesday granted bail in the 2G spectrum allocation case. He is the last of the 14 individuals charged in the case still in prison.

The bail was granted by Central Bureau of Investigation (CBI) special judge OP Saini. Raja has been in Tihar jail since February last year.

Raja’s counsel told reporters that the judge called Raja towards him and told him: “Your bail application is allowed.”

“The bail application is allowed,” Special CBI Judge O P Saini said.

The court granted bail to the DMK MP on a personal bond of Rs 20 lakh and two sureties of the like amount. The court while granting bail imposed conditions on Raja that he will not visit Tamil Nadu without its prior permission and will not go to the office of the Department of Telecom (DoT).

The court, in its 14-page bail order, also said that Raja would not try to influence any witnesses while on bail. Raja was arrested on February 2, last year.

The announcement triggered wild slogan shouting and cheering by his DMK supporters mainly from Tamil Nadu, who raised slogans in Tamil like: “Raja, vazhga!” (Long Live Raja!)

Besides the 14 individuals, three companies were also charged in the case.

“Thirteen people had already got bail, and Raja was the last to get bail,” the counsel said.

“Raja had not moved bail until all other 13 were granted bail,” he added. “Now all the accused are on bail. The case will go on.”

The counsel pointed out that Raja had got bail despite the CBI’s opposition.

The CBI had opposed Raja’s bail application, saying he faced charges of accepting bribes of Rs 200 crore, which makes his case different from former telecom secretary Siddharth Behura, who was granted bail by the Supreme Court last week.

Raja, in his bail application, has requested the court to release him on the ground of parity.

The agency said that important prosecution witnesses of department of telecommunications and other private people, especially connected to alleged bribe transaction of Rs. 200 crore from DB Group companies to Kalaignar TV, are yet to be examined.

It told the court that if the accused was released on bail at this crucial stage of trial, then he may influence the vital witness as some of them belong to his state Tamil Nadu.

Raja resigned as minister Nov 14, 2010 in the wake of the Comptroller and Auditor General reporting that his 2008 decision to allocate 2G spectrum on a first-come-first-served basis had caused the exchequer a presumptive loss of Rs 1.76 lakh crore. The CBI arrested him Feb 2, 2011.

The Supreme Court in February cancelled 122 spectrum licences allocated during Raja’s tenure. It also ruled that all natural resources should be allocated through an auction, which the government is now preparing to do in the case of the cancelled licences.

Makers Wanted: Are You A Hardware Start-Up? Talk To Us

We’re about to launch a new video series called Makers here at TechCrunch and we’d love to hear from any and all hardware based startups. I want to hear about robots, toys, and railguns. I want to hear about new distilling methods, winemakers, and electric vehicles. I want to hear about anything that whirrs, chops, grates, goes, or crashes into a fireball.

Over the next few months Jordan Crook, Josh Zelman, and I will try to cover every hardware startup we come across. If you think you’re worthy of inclusion, please drop us a line at john@techcrunch.com with the subject line “MAKER WANTED.” Describe your product and maybe send a photo of your facility? Are you building in the US or Europe? Asia or Mexico? Let us know.

We’re accepting submissions for the next few weeks, so there is plenty of time. Just let us know where you are and what’s up and we’ll try to do the rest.

Facebook’s Prospects May Rest on Trove of Data

SAN FRANCISCO — Mark ZuckerbergFacebook’s chief, has managed to amass more information about more people than anyone else in history.

Now what?

As Facebook turns to Wall Street in the biggest public offering ever by an Internet company, it faces a new, unenviable test: how to keep growing and enriching its hungry new shareholders.

The answer lies in what Facebook will be able to do — and how quickly — with its crown jewel: its status as an online directory for a good chunk of the human race, with the names, photos, tastes and desires of nearly a billion people.

Facebook’s shares are expected to begin trading as early as this week. Already, lots of investors are scrambling to buy those shares, with giddy hopes that it will become a big moneymaker like Google. Because of that high demand, Facebook is expected to increase its offering price from its initial range, giving the company a valuation possibly as high as $104 billion.

In the eight years since it sprang out of a Harvard dorm room, Facebook has signed up users at breakneck speed, kept them glued to the site for longer stretches of time and turned a profit by using their personal information to customize the ads they see.

Whether it can spin that data into enough gold to justify a valuation of as much as $104 billion remains unclear.

“We know Facebook has an awful lot of data, but what they have not worked out yet is the most effective means of using that data for advertising,” said Catherine Tucker, a professor of marketing at the Sloan School of Management at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. “They are going to have to experiment a lot more.”

Analysts, investors and company executives can rattle off any number of challenges facing the company. As it works to better match ads to people, it has to avoid violating its users’ perceived sense of privacy or inviting regulatory scrutiny. It needs to find other ways to generate revenue, like allowing people to buy more goods and services with Facebook Credits, a kind of virtual currency. Most urgently it has to make money on mobile devices, the window to Facebook for more and more people.

All the while, its ability to innovate with new features and approaches — to “break things,” in the words of Mr. Zuckerberg — may be markedly constrained once it has investors to answer to.

“They are going to have to think about whether they can continue with the motto ‘Done is better than perfect,’ ” said Susan Etlinger, an industry analyst at the Altimeter Group. “When you’re operating as a public company, life is very different. We haven’t seen that play out yet. It’s going to take a few quarters to figure out what a public Facebook is going to look like.”

Skeptics point out that the company’s revenue growth showed signs of slowing in the first quarter of 2012. And a Bloomberg survey of 1,253 investors, analysts and traders found that a substantial majority were dubious about the eye-popping valuation Facebook was seeking. “It’s a risky asset. No doubt about that,” said Brian Wieser, of Pivotal Research Group. “Google was less risky.” No matter. Mr. Wieser says he thinks that Facebook is worth $83 billion and that its revenue will grow by at least 30 percent for the next five years.

The comparisons to Google are inevitable. When that company went public in 2004, there were so many doubters that the company lowered its offering price to $85 a share. It closed at just over $100 on the first day of trading, and now sells for more than $600. Facebook is farther along than Google was in terms of revenue, having brought in nearly $4 billion last year, or $5.11 a user, compared with Google’s $2 billion in 2003.

One Facebook investor, who spoke on the condition of anonymity because of market regulations as the offering draws near, noted that when Google went public it already had a clear business strategy. By contrast, he described Facebook this way: “They have built an incredibly valuable asset — as opposed to a business they have executed well.”

The most pressing issue for Facebook executives may be the mobile challenge. Already, over half of Facebook’s 901 million users access the site through mobile devices. In regulatory filings, the company says mobile use is growing fastest in some of Facebook’s largest markets, including the United States, India and Brazil. Facebook goes on to acknowledge that it makes little to no money on mobile and that “our ability to do so successfully is unproven.”

There is not much space on mobile screens to show advertisements. And Google and Apple, two of Facebook’s biggest rivals, control the basic software on most smartphones, which could make it harder for the company to make inroads there. Facebook’s response to this challenge so far has been to aggressively acquire companies focused on mobile, including Instagram, for which it paid $1 billion in April. But it warned in a revision to its offering documents last week that the mobile shift meant it was adding users faster than it was increasing the number of ads it displayed.

What Facebook already has — more than any other digital company — is a spectacularly rich vault of information about its users, who cannot seem to stay away from the site. Americans, on average, now spend 20 percent of their online time on Facebook alone, thanks to the ever-growing menu of activities the company has introduced, from playing games to sampling music to posting pictures of baby showers and drunken escapades. Some 300 million photos are uploaded to the site daily.

How Facebook exploits its users’ information — and how those users react — is the next reckoning. David Eastman, worldwide digital director for the advertising agency JWT, said Facebook would need to give marketers more data about what kinds of users click on what kinds of advertising, and about their travels on the Internet before and after they click on an ad. Most brands want to have a presence on Facebook, he said, but they do not quite understand who sees their pitches and whether they lead to greater sales.

“They need to make the data work more,” Mr. Eastman said. “They need to provide deeper data. Right now the value of Facebook advertising is largely unknown.”

While the bulk of Facebook’s revenue comes from North America, it is banking on international growth. The company has expanded its global footprint so rapidly that four out of five Facebook users are now outside the United States. It is the dominant social network in large emerging markets like Brazil and India, though it shows no signs of penetrating China — where it would face not only government censorship but stiff competition from homegrown social networks.

Mr. Zuckerberg, who has studied Mandarin, signaled his ambitions to crack the vast Chinese market as far back as 2010. He suggested that Facebook would first try to advance deeper into markets like Russia and Japan before it took on a country as “complex” as China.

With international growth comes international regulatory headaches. Facebook already faces audits in Europe on whether the company is living up to promises made to consumers about how it uses their data — and now, a stringent new data protection law. In India, it has been sued for spreading offensive content. And in the United States, it faces privacy audits by the Federal Trade Commission for the next 20 years. In its offering documents, Facebook repeatedly warns of legislative and regulatory scrutiny over user privacy, “which may adversely affect our reputation and brand.”

Maintaining brand loyalty is excruciatingly difficult in the Internet business. Across Silicon Valley, investors are plotting the next big thing in social networks. Already, the clock may be ticking for Facebook.

“There is no consumer-facing Internet brand or site that ever keeps consumers’ attention for more than 10 years,” said Tim Chang, a managing director at Mayfield Fund. “It is not hard to imagine that in 10 years, people are going to be off of Facebook even.”

Mr. Zuckerberg has an answer to that. In the video for investors released this month, Mr. Zuckerberg hinted at the ambitions he had for the company. Facebook, in his vision, will hook itself into the rest of the Web, making itself indispensable. Already Facebook serves as a de facto Internet passport, allowing users to log in with their Facebook identities and explore millions of other Web sites and applications.

“I think that we’re going to reach this point where almost every app that you use is going to be integrated with Facebook in some way,” Mr. Zuckerberg says in the video. “We make decisions at Facebook not optimizing for what is going to happen in the next year, but what’s going to set us up for this world where every product experience you have is social, and that’s all powered by Facebook.”